Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Annual Conference on Parasitology & Infectious Diseases Istanbul, Turkey .

Day 2 :

  • Parasitic Diseases & Plant Pathogens | Infectious Diseases and Health Care | Laboratory Diagnosis - Therapeutic Parasitology
Location: Akdeniz 1
Speaker

Chair

Fatma Hamed Shalan

Menofia University, Egypt

Session Introduction

Omar M Amin

Parasitology Center Inc., USA

Title: Variability of Acanthocephalans

Time : 10:00-11:00

Speaker
Biography:

Omar M. Amin, M.Sc. in medical entomology, Ph.D. in Parasitology and Infectious Diseases, and DNM. Research experience at CDC Atlanta, Georgia and at NAMRU-3 (US Naval Medical Research Unit # 3) Cairo, He has received many awards and grants by US Army and national and state agencies annually. The Persian Gulf research was supported by 2 Fulbright Research Scholarships. He has published over 245 major publications including ones on Herbal Remedies for Parasitic Infections and a 5- part video series on Parasite Infections in Humans. He is currently the Director of the Parasitology Center, Inc. (PCI), and the Institute of Parasitic Diseases, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA at www.parasitetesting.com, with subunits in Mexico, U.K., and West Africa.
 

Abstract:

Unique and unusual features in the many species of Acanthocephalans described and/or studied by Amin from fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, in various parts of the world including South America, Vietnam, Japan, the United States, the Middle East and North and East Africa are described. The presentation is in five parts.
1. An introductory section dealing with the classification, general morphology, ecology and life cycles of the Acanthocephala.
2. Unusual anatomical features of taxonomic or of questionable taxonomic importance addressing variations in the proboscis, proboscis hooks, male and female reproductive organs and lemnisci. Newly described structures including (a) Para-Receptacle Structure (PRS) and hoods in certain species as well as a new order of Acanthocephala from Vietnamese birds, are also featured.
3. Structural and functional relationships explaining the relationship between the metamorphosis of the giant nuclei in Eoacanthocephala and worm reproductive cycle.
4. Host-parasite relationships elucidating the relationships between worm anatomy and biology during worm growth.
5. Curiosities in reviews and revisions highlighting taxonomically based zoo-geographical patterns and trends in the genera Neoechinorhynchus, Polymorphus and Pallisentis. A comprehensive treatment of the Acanthocephalans of South America and those marine forms off the Eastern United States is also included here. A look at the September 2013 classification scheme of the Acanthocephala is included covering 4 classes, 26 families, 157 genera, and 1298 species are included.
 

Break: Networking & Refreshments 11:00-11:20 @ Foyer

Omar M Amin

Parasitology Center Inc., USA

Title: Variability of Acanthocephalans
Biography:

Abstract:

Unique and unusual features in the many species of Acanthocephalans described and/or studied by Amin from fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, in various parts of the world including South America, Vietnam, Japan, the United States, the Middle East and North and East Africa are described. The presentation is in five parts.
1. An introductory section dealing with the classification, general morphology, ecology and life cycles of the Acanthocephala.
2. Unusual anatomical features of taxonomic or of questionable taxonomic importance addressing variations in the proboscis, proboscis hooks, male and female reproductive organs and lemnisci. Newly described structures including (a) Para-Receptacle Structure (PRS) and hoods in certain species as well as a new order of Acanthocephala from Vietnamese birds, are also featured.
3. Structural and functional relationships explaining the relationship between the metamorphosis of the giant nuclei in Eoacanthocephala and worm reproductive cycle.
4. Host-parasite relationships elucidating the relationships between worm anatomy and biology during worm growth.
5. Curiosities in reviews and revisions highlighting taxonomically based zoo-geographical patterns and trends in the genera Neoechinorhynchus, Polymorphus and Pallisentis. A comprehensive treatment of the Acanthocephalans of South America and those marine forms off the Eastern United States is also included here. A look at the September 2013 classification scheme of the Acanthocephala is included covering 4 classes, 26 families, 157 genera, and 1298 species are included.
 

Omar M Amin

Parasitology Center Inc., USA

Title: Variability of Acanthocephalans
Biography:

Abstract:

Unique and unusual features in the many species of Acanthocephalans described and/or studied by Amin from fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, in various parts of the world including South America, Vietnam, Japan, the United States, the Middle East and North and East Africa are described. The presentation is in five parts.
1. An introductory section dealing with the classification, general morphology, ecology and life cycles of the Acanthocephala.
2. Unusual anatomical features of taxonomic or of questionable taxonomic importance addressing variations in the proboscis, proboscis hooks, male and female reproductive organs and lemnisci. Newly described structures including (a) Para-Receptacle Structure (PRS) and hoods in certain species as well as a new order of Acanthocephala from Vietnamese birds, are also featured.
3. Structural and functional relationships explaining the relationship between the metamorphosis of the giant nuclei in Eoacanthocephala and worm reproductive cycle.
4. Host-parasite relationships elucidating the relationships between worm anatomy and biology during worm growth.
5. Curiosities in reviews and revisions highlighting taxonomically based zoo-geographical patterns and trends in the genera Neoechinorhynchus, Polymorphus and Pallisentis. A comprehensive treatment of the Acanthocephalans of South America and those marine forms off the Eastern United States is also included here. A look at the September 2013 classification scheme of the Acanthocephala is included covering 4 classes, 26 families, 157 genera, and 1298 species are included.
 

Omar M Amin

Parasitology Center Inc., USA

Title: Variability of Acanthocephalans
Biography:

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

Motivated student currently working towards degree in molecular biology (molecular genetics and cytogenetics). Adept at prepping resources, equipment, and materials for research.  Extensive background in investigating molecular parasitology   and microniology.  Seeking to secure rewarding Research Assistant role to facilitate Research for thesis. Efficient Research Assistant able to complete a wide range of support tasks under strict schedules. Systematic and meticulous in all work. Eager to contribute to infectious diseases research. Skilled Research Assistant knowledgeable about conventional PCR, Real time PCR and Elisa.

Abstract:

H.pylori and intestinal parasites are known for their high prevalence in children. Both of them infect the gastrointestinal tract with overlapping clinical pictures. This study was conducted to determine H.pylori prevalence and its association with intestinal parasites in children, moreover to estimate risk and predictive factors for their detection in stool samples. Single fecal samples were collected from 226 Egyptian pediatric patients (125 diarrheic and 101 non-diarrheic) attending gastroenterology outpatients’ clinics, from February 2016 to June 2017. All stool specimens were microscopically examined to search for ova and parasites. Copro-DNAs detection of H.pylori and Cryptosporidium were performed using nested-PCR assays.H. pylori was detected molecularly in 36.8% of the total study population, with a higher prevalence in diarrheic than in non-diarrheic children. Intestinal parasites were detected in 27.4% of the total study population, of these, 43.9% had co-existence with H.pylori colonized patients and was significantly associated with Cryptosporidium spp. and G.intestinalis. Estimated risk of the presence of H.pylori in January. Our data provide a better understanding of the epidemiology of H.pylori infection when associated with intestinal parasites. H.pylori co-existence with G.intestinals and Cryptosporidium may suggest the association of H.pylori infection with markers of fecal exposure. Whether H.pylori provides favorable conditions for intestinal parasitosis or vice versa, still further investigations are needed with an emphasis upon determining correlation with gut microbiomes.

Speaker
Biography:

Zahra Hesari has completed her PhD in Pharmaceutics from Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran. She is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutics at School of Pharmacy, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Her major research interest includes formulation and physicochemical evaluation of orally disintegrating tablets and neural tissue engineering. She has published more than 6 papers in reputed journals. She is also a Reviewer of several national and international journals. 

Abstract:

Echinococcus granulosus parasite causes a zoonotic disease which is important for public and veterinary health. Since pumpkin seeds (Cucurbita sp) are used as traditional vermifuge in Iran, they may be a potential herbal anthelmintic. This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro scolicidal effect of Cucurbita moschata seeds. Hydro alcoholic and petroleum ether extracts were prepared by maceration and Soxhlet, respectively. Both extracts with four different concentrations (100, 10, 1, 0.1 mg/ml) were incubated against protoscoleces in 5, 15, 30 and 60 minutes. Maximum mortality was 16% with 1% hydro alcoholic extract in 60 minutes. Highest mortality with organic extract was 4% with 10% concentration in 60 minutes (P=0.015). Since highest mortality was 16%, the extract didn’t reach to LD 50 (50% mortality). Therefore, the potency of the total extract is not sufficient as potential scolicidal drug.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Rifat Ullah Khan is working as Researcher in the field of poultry nutrition and production. His Areas of Specialization is Male fertility and semen quality and immune system in poultry as affected by antioxidants, protein and probiotics.
 

Abstract:

The present study was designed to find the effect of ginger and garlic on the performance and integrity of gut in experimentally induced coccidiosis in broiler chickens. A total of 200 day-old Hubbard broiler chicks were divided into six equal groups as T1-Control (basal diet only) T2-Infected, untreated (positive control) T3-Infected and supplemented with garlic at 15 g/ kg feed, T4-Infected and supplemented with gingers at 5 g/kg feed, T5-Infected and treated with amprolium hydrochloride at 1.25 g/liter drinking water, T6-Infected and supplemented with mixture of garlic and ginger at the rate of 2.5 and 7.5 g/kg feed. The results showed that feed intake, body weight and Feed Conversion Ratio (FCR) was significantly (P<0.05) high in ginger and garlic supplemented birds compared to the positive control. Similarly, oocysts shedding, lesion score and histopathology of the small intestines improved in ginger and garlic supplemented birds after induced-infection in broiler. The findings of the present study showed that ginger and garlic produced encouraging results in comparison to Amprolium in broiler chickens infected with experimental coccidiosis.
 

 

Break: Lunch Break 12:50-13:40 @ Daphe Restaurant
Speaker
Biography:

Hridaya Shanker Singh is present Pro- Vice Chancellor, Ch. Charan Singh University, Meerut; Chairman, IQAC, Ch. Charan Singh University, Meerut and Head, Department of Zoology, Ch. Charan Singh University, Meerut. He is having life Memberships and awards in Helminthological Society of India, Indian Society of Parasitology, Society of Parasitology and Applied Animal Biology, Indian Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology, Zoological Society of India, Indian Science Congress Association.
 

Abstract:

Studies about biodiversity of helminthes (excluding Monogeneans) in India were started from the middle of 20th century by helminthologist who came to this country on medical or military deputation from foreign lands. As regard biodiversity studies related to Indian Monogeneans is concerned, it also started w.e.f., 1940s by workers like - Chauhan, Thapar, Jain, Unnithan, Gupta (SP), Gupta (NK), Agarwal (GP), Ramalingam, Tripathi, Gussev etc. Recently, Pandey and Agrawal compiled a comprehensive account of known species of Monogeneans from India which is estimated to be about 300, which is far from complete. Indian subcontinent is blessed with five major river systems of India viz., Ganga, Brahmaputra, Indus, East coast and West coast river systems. These rivers are long and are further fed strengthened by many large and important tributaries. Moreover, many small seasonal and perennial rivers also use to contribute to these river systems separately. The investigator is actively engaged in the study of freshwater Monogeneans since 1980. The present study reveals that about 35.45% fishes have so far been investigated for Monogenean infection in general and still 74% are remaining that are not screened. Helminth parasites, particularly Monogeneans leads greater losses on account of having direct life cycle, which can be completed easily in a closed system of fish culture. If we stick to one host one parasite rule, there exists a very big gap as far as state of our knowledge related to biodiversity of freshwater Monogeneans are concerned. It is clear from the present review that much remains to be done about this group within India with newer tools including molecular studies.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Fatma shalan has completed her bachelor of medicine with excellent grade in 2006 from Faculty of Medicine, Menofia University. She has completed her M.Sc. in Medical Parasitology in 2012. Her thesis was about the relationship between IL-6 and some parasitic infections in hepatic patients in Menofia governorate. This abstract is representative of her M.D. thesis.
 

Abstract:

Neurotoxocariasis is a serious condition linked to the reduced cognitive function in children and some neurodegenerative diseases. Unfortunately, the available drugs for its treatment are with variable results. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used in experimental and clinical trials and it gave promising therapeutic results. Therefore, this study was designed using forty T. canis-infected albino mice (1000 eggs/mouse, orally) and a control group (GI) of ten healthy mice. The infected groups were GII: infected non-treated (control group), GIII: albendazole-treated (100 mg/kg/d once orally for 5 successive days), GIV: MSCs-treated (3 x 106 MSCs in 0.1 mL of PBS via the tail vein) and GV: albendazole + MSCs-treated. Treatment was commenced 6 weeks p.i. and the experiment was terminated four weeks after treatment. The brain tissue of each mouse was subjected for histopathological, immunohistochemical studies (caspase-3, TGF-β), detection or T. canis DNA by real-time PCR and gene expression the biomarkers of brain damage (S100B, GFAP) by RT-PCR. Moreover, homing of iron oxide-labelled MSCs in brain tissues was assessed by Prussian blue stain. The brain tissues of GII showed numerous T. canis larvae, significant congestion, thickening of arterioles, inflammatory infiltrate and gliosis associated with marked immunohistochemical expression of TGF-β and caspase-3 as well as marked S100B and GFAP gene expression. Significant improvements of the previous parameters and T. canis DNA were recorded in all the treated groups. However, the best results were obtained with combined albendazole + MSCs therapy. Thus, MSCs could be considered in the treatment of chronic neurotoxocariasis.

 

Break: Networking & Refreshments 14:40-15:00 @ Foyer
  • Poster Presentations
Location: Akdeniz 1

Session Introduction

Cornelia Voigtlander

Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Germany

Title: The role of MORN1 in the intraerythrocytic life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum

Time : INF-01

Speaker
Biography:

Cornelia Voigtlander has completed her studies in Life Science from Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Germany. She is currently pursuing her PhD at Institute of Medical Biotechnology in Erlangen.
 

Abstract:

Due to increasing drug resistance of Plasmodium falciparum, a search for novel drug targets is of great importance. In this respect, the nuclear division cycles of the malaria parasite are of particular interest, since they differ from traditional mitosis in several aspects. Thus, gaining deeper insights into the parasite mitosis, its underlying dynamics and the involved proteins may reveal an entire array of novel targets. In this respect, the membrane occupation and recognition nexus protein 1 (MORN1) which is conserved among Apicomplexa may be a promising candidate. In Toxoplasma gondii MORN1 is associated with the spindle poles and the Inner Membrane Complex (IMC). Overexpression of TgMORN1 results in serious defects in nuclear segregation. In P. falciparum, MORN1 has been found to be solely expressed in schizonts suggesting a function during mitosis. To further elucidate Morn1 function in P. falciparum, affinity purified anti-PfMORN1-antibodies were used for stage specific Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence analysis. The anti-PfMorn1-antibody detected a single band of the expected size of 41.4 kDa. Highest PfMorn1 amounts were found in schizonts and segmenters consistent with its function in mitosis and its association with the IMC. However, contrary to previous studies PfMorn1 expression was also found in rings, which could be confirmed using a second antibody. These results are in good agreement with the microscopic examination. Segmenter stages showed a pattern that could be characteristic for an association with the IMC of merozoites. Rings, however, showed DNA associated MORN1-structures, located terminally at the crescent shaped DNA. The latter findings suggests that MORN1 may not only be crucial for the nuclear division, but may also be required in the earlier development of P. falciparum, making it even more suited as potential drug target.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Faisal Moin has completed his MBBS , FCPS (MEDICINE) from college of Physician and Surgeons, Pakistan. He is currently working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at National University of Health Sciences College of Medicine, Sultante of Oman
 

Abstract:

Background & Aim: Dengue fever and malaria both can present with thrombocytopenia and is regarded as a strong predictor of dengue fever. Thrombocytopenia is also considered criterion of disease severity, bad prognostic factor and its presence is associated with increase probability of malaria. The study aims to determine frequency of co-existence of dengue fever and malaria in thrombocytopenic patients presented with acute febrile illness in tertiary care hospital.

Method: Cross-sectional, observational study was conducted at the department of Emergency Medicine, Ziauddin University Hospital, Karachi from April 2013 to January 2014. A total of 159 patients meeting inclusion criteria were included in this study. 5 ml of blood by venupuncture in EDTA anti-coagulant for platelet count and preparing thick and thin films and 2 ml of blood in plain bottle for detection of dengue specific IgM was collected from all patients. Thick films are used to identify malarial parasites and thin films to identify specie. Dengue fever was diagnosed on positive dengue IgM. Co-existence was labeled as positive if malarial parasites and dengue IgM found to be present at the same time. This diffusion susceptibility test was used to determine susceptibility of bacterial agents to antibiotics. Data was analyzed by descriptive statistics using SPSS software version 19.

Results: Overall mean (±SD) age was 38.3±7.9 years, with Male to female ratio was 1.1: 1. Coinfections (Dengue and Malaria) were diagnosed in 5 (5.6%) of cases. From 5 cases, 3 (60%) were male and 2 (40%) were female. Mean (±SD) age of 5 positive cases of co-infection was 37.8±8.3 years.

Conclusion: Concurrent infections were found 5.6% in this study, however, this percentage is slightly low and special consideration should be given to the likelihood of co-infection with dengue and malaria.

Speaker
Biography:

Mohammed Hussein Eltoum Salih is a Public Health Specialist. He has completed his MSc from Khartoum University. He is a Sudanese Red Crescent Member, Lecturer at Medical Institute and an Assistant Professor at Karary University.
 

Abstract:

This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of S. haematobium infection among school children from four villages namely Jadeed, Alandraba, Um Gaar and EL Shetabe in White Nile State, Sudan and to elucidate the impact of praziquantel on the reduction of the disease prevalence as well as the impact of health education on attitude, knowledge and behavior of children towards different aspects of the disease. The simple random technique was employed to choose school children of study villages. The effects of Praziquantel and health education were assessed prior and one year after launching parasitological, treatment and health education campaigns. The results revealed that the overall prevalence of S. haematobium infection in the four villages was 25%. The intervention using praziquantel showed a significant difference (P<0.05) and the prevalence of infection was reduced from 22% to Zero among Jadeed school children, from 47% to 9% among Um Gaar school children and from 29% to 5% among those of El Shetabe village, while increased from 1% to 5% among Alandraba school children.

 

Speaker
Biography:

He, Abhishek Gupta, is a PhD research scholar at Department of Zoology, DN (PG) College, Meerut (UP), India. His research area is molecular taxonomy. He has expertise in molecular biology. 

Abstract:

During the survey of freshwater fish Wallago attu, severe infection of known myxosporean species, Thelohanellus batae Lalitha kumari,1969 belonging to genus Thelohellnus Kudo, 1933 parasitizing gill filaments was found from Meerut District (UP), India. This species was described on the basis of morphology of plasmodia, histology findings on locations of plasmodia and DNA sequence data. Plasmodia of T. wallogoi are characterized in having spores measuring 11.8 to 6.7 µm, pyriform in valvular view and lenticular in sutural view having anterior end pointed and posterior end rounded with shell valves.  Mature plasmodia are histozoic with single polar capsule measuring 7.2 to 3.0 µm, having polar filaments of 18 µm with 4 to 5 coilings. Histology reveal no pathological changes but severe infections. SEM revealed flat surface. Supplemented 18S rRNA gene sequence of T. batae did not show a close relationship with any other Thelohanellus spp., represented in gene bank. 

Break: Panel Discussion